Go with the flow

Trying yoga for the first time can be an intimidating experience. But that misses the point of this ancient practice that combines stretching, breath … and peace

Yoga instructor Petri Brill strikes a pose at her studio YogaSport, which provides beginners’ classes for the uninitiated. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

Yoga instructor Petri Brill strikes a pose at her studio YogaSport, which provides beginners’ classes for the uninitiated. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

JEF TINGLEY  | Contributing Writer

Some do it for their mind, some do it for their body, some do it for both. But all yoga students have one thing in common: Making the first step and taking up the practice. And while this age-old combination of stretching and breathing is meant to calm the mind and strengthen the muscles, a maiden voyage into a posterior-lifting position like downward-facing dog in a room full of strangers can send one’s heart racing. But that doesn’t have to be the case.

“People new to yoga should remember that everyone in class was a beginner at one point,” says Petri Brill, manager of YogaSport Dallas on Lemmon Avenue. “Yoga is a journey, not a destination. There is no perfect practice or perfect yogi or perfect yoga body. I think people worry about they’ll look [or] feel foolish in their first down-dog [and] that they’ll be judged. Our [yoga] community is diverse, encouraging and accepting: no judgment here!”

Mary Pierce Armstrong, who teaches at MarYoga, agrees that you should always look inward. “Yoga will come to meet you no matter where you are starting from. As long as you take the breath and the breaks you need, you will be doing awesome.”

For Wendy Moore, a 44-year-old yoga newbie, has taken these words of wisdom to the mat — literally. Moore recently completed her second MarYoga class as part of her new year regime. Any inhibitions she had about the experience were dispelled during her first visit.

“[I was] concerned about my general lack of bendy-ness, and not knowing where to put what arm and leg,” she says, “but if you look around you will figure out where your limbs are supposed to be by what others are doing.” Moore has continued to work on poses between classes with some slight variations mimicked by “what her cats are able to do.”

Keith Murray, a 37-year-old registered nurse, tried yoga for the first time more than eight years ago and was immediately hooked. He was taking classes three times a week before long. “I was a little intimidated about the whole thing at first,” he says, “but after my first couple of sessions my intimidation grew into excitement.”

A busy work schedule has kept Murray from his regular routine over the years, but he is trying to change that. “I still maintain a crazy life and work routine, but building yoga back into my life has really helped me to find balance again.”

According to yoga teacher Jennifer Lawson of SYNC Yoga & Wellbeing, it’s not just busy schedules and bundled nerves that keep people from the practice of yoga; it’s also our cultural fixation on success. “There tends to be so much emphasis on achievement and perfection that many of us are becoming accustomed to playing it safe in order to avoid the possibility of shame.”

Lawson recommends coming together as a group in a class with experienced and inexperienced yogis to create an environment that emphasizes the experience and process of yoga and not the destination or end result.

For Anisha Mandol, a 42-year-old business development manager who has been practicing yoga for about two years, these words ring true. “Once you understand your expectation from practicing, no one else’s matters. The benefits of yoga are fluid and dynamic, and each person has their own unique experience. Own yours,” she says.

And so it would seem that just as the journey of a million miles begins with one step, the journey toward a yoga-filled life begins with a single stretch on the matt (and maybe a little Namaste for good measure).

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SAY NAMASTE: WHERE TO GET YOUR YOGA FIX

Options are plentiful for the budding yogi looking for a class. Get your stretch on at these studios in and around the gayborhood. You can also find information on their class offerings and schedules on their websites.

Yoga Sport Dallas
4140 Lemmon Ave, Suite 280
214-520-YOGA
YogaSportDallas.com

SYNC Yoga & Wellbeing
611 N. Bishop Ave.
214-843-3372
SyncDallas.com

MarYoga at Chi Studio
807 Fletcher St.
ChiDallas.com

Sunstone Yoga
2907 Routh St. (and other locations)
214-764-2119
SunstoneYoga.com

Gaia Flow Yoga Uptown
3000 Blackburn St., Suite 140B
214-235-1153
GaiaFlowYoga.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 17, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

“Defining Marriage: A Debate!” at U of H tomorrow

Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse

Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse

One day we will get to the point where an University inviting guests to debate marriage equality will be greeted with the same scorn that an on-campus debate on women’s suffrage or whether or not African-Americans are 3/5 of a person would engender, but that day is not today. Just in time for the expected U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruling on Prop. 8  tomorrow, Feb. 7, the Federalist Society and Outlaw at the University of Houston present “Defining Marriage: A Debate!” at noon in the Bates Law Building room 109.

Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, founder of the Ruth Institute, a project of the National Organization for Marriage, will be on hand to defend the continued prohibition against marriage equality. Mitchell Katine, who served as local counsel in Lawrence v. Texas (the Supreme Court case declaring Texas’ law against “homosexual conduct” unconstitutional) will defend marriage as a civil right, constitutionally guaranteed by equal protection under the law.

As a bonus the first 70 attendees to arrive will receive a free Chick-Fil-A sandwich and waffle fries, because we like our civil rights debated with a side of irony.

After the jump get a sneak peak at the kind of keen logical arguments to be expected from Dr. Morse:

—  admin

Jennifer Grey Wins DWTS

And as everyone in the world with a computer knows by now, Bristol Palin came in third. Confession: I’d been secretly hoping that Bristol would win. You know why. Snork! Anyway, homocon Tammy Bruce went all Lady Miss Sour Grapes on Twitter once Bristol was eliminated.Bruce followed up that bit with this: “While LibProgs were obsessing on #dwts…Ohio judge allows third healthcare reform challenge to go forward. Bwahahaha!” Uh, I think the person organizing “Operation Bristol” was the obsessive party here, Miss Kapo USA.

In other reactions, GOProud’s Chris Barron warned: “There are no judges scores in elections. Just saying :) ” And Sarah Palin tweeted this: “Well, what a great ride! Competition is good for everyone.Be inspired by those who step up to challenges & improve w/each step; Congrats Jen!”

So far, nothing but silence from Kevin DuJan. Poor baby.

Joe. My. God.

—  admin

KKK Plans Protest For Anti-Gay Student Jennifer Keeton

6a00d8341c730253ef013486629d1a970c-800wi Well here's something unsettling: members of the Ku Klux Klan have decided to stage a rally in honor of Jennifer Keeton, the former August State University counseling student who sued for not being able to tell potential patients that homosexuality's an "identity disorder."

The KKK, like Keeton, believes the Georgia-based school violated her First Amendment rights. "It's your constitutional right, so how could you tell someone you have to do something completely different?" said Bobby Spurlock, imperial wizard of the KKK's North and South Carolina branches.

Spurlock also said that Keeton hasn't endorsed their action, scheduled for October 23 at ASU, although he did cryptically suggest a link: “She has not contacted us but we were contacted by someone that is aware of her.”

A judge tossed Keeton's First Amendment lawsuit against ASU earlier this year.

Perhaps the KKK will be met with protests similar to those that welcomed the Westboro Baptist Church yesterday.


Towleroad News #gay

—  John Wright

Judge: Christian Counseling Student Jennifer Keeton Has No Grounds to Sue Augusta State University

Throwing out counseling student Jennifer Keeton's discrimination lawsuit against Augusta State University — which said Keeton cannot tells gay patients they are immoral, despite her Christian beliefs, and will expel her if she insists on it — federal Judge Randal Hall said the school's demand she attend a remediation program was perfectly reasonable and did not violate her constitutional rights.

CONTINUED »


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Queerty

—  John Wright