Liebbe releases confidential report from DISD and responds to charges

Jeremy+Liebbe

Jeremy Liebbe

DISD investigator Jeremy Liebbe, who was fired earlier this month, has released a document from the district marked “confidential” that explains charges against him.

The school district investigated seven charges against Liebbe during his suspension from the district and responded to the allegations over the weekend. The charges range from attempting to disable the IT department’s access to the computer servers without IT’s knowledge to running a background check on his supervisor who failed to divulge information about her criminal background on her employment application.

DISD hired the firm of Vincent Lopez PC to investigate the matters. Carlos Lopez conducted the investigation, spoke to some district employees as well as Liebbe, and conducted a check of Liebbe’s emails on his district-issued laptop.

“Throughout the past eight weeks I fully cooperated with the district’s administration, attorney Carlos Lopez, and the district’s internal auditors,” Liebbe said. “I wish I could say they extended me the same courtesy.”

In his response, Liebbe discounts each of the charges.

As part of his job description, Liebbe’s responsibility was to “manage the implementation of the security of all investigative files and systems.”

The district claims Liebbe installed security camera in his department without informing personnel outside his department. Liebbe said the district installed two of the cameras and purchased the other four. When the other four were not installed, he and another investigator installed them. Both sides agree he let everyone in his department know the cameras were there.

Liebbe had another employee look up the criminal background of Tonya Grayson, his supervisor. He felt it was inappropriate to check her background himself, since he reported directly to her.

The other employee found her criminal background but wasn’t comfortable with having checked her background, so reported the incident to her superiors that same day.

The district questioned Liebbe’s checking the criminal background of new investigators coming into his department.

“State law requires criminal history background checks on all incoming employees of the district,” Bill Liebbe wrote in his answer to DISD.

Bill Liebbe is Jeremy’s father and has taken over as Jeremy’s lead attorney.

Another charge involves Liebbe encouraging and influencing other members of his team to file grievances over Grayson’s refusal to allow them to work over the July 4 holiday. Because one of his employees didn’t have enough seniority, her pay was docked for the holiday.

Liebbe said he encouraged an employee to speak with the payroll department to see what her options were.

The district wrote, “Liebbe very aggressively attempted to persuade some of the PSO employees to file a grievance against Grayson.”

None of the employees did file a grievance, “despite Liebbe’s encouragements.”

The sixth question involves Liebbe remotely accessing his district-issued laptop and deleting information from it while on administrative leave. Investigators claim they found software on the computer to remotely access the computer and during the investigation found his emails wiped out, user profile deleted and usage of his dropbox.

Liebbe claims he installed the software in case his computer was hacked or stolen because of sensitive and confidential information kept on the laptop.

“Copies of all of those documents remain on district servers,” Bill Liebbe wrote in the response.

A final complaint involves getting parental consent to record interviews during investigations involving student witnesses or complainants.

“An employee shall obtain written consent from a student’s parent or guardian and from his or her principal before the employee may make or authorize a videotape of a student or record or authorize the recording of a student’s voice,” the district wrote.

“The recording by PSO investigators of student interviews, without obtaining consent from the parent or guardian does not violate district board policy or the Texas Education Code,” Bill Liebbe wrote in response.

—  David Taffet

UPDATE: Liebbe placed on leave for investigating boss

Jeremy+Liebbe

Jeremy Liebbe

Jeremy Liebbe, the gay D.I.S.D. administrator placed on leave last week, had been investigating his boss in the human resources department for lying about her criminal background on her job application, according to the Dallas Morning News.

Liebbe’s investigation began after learning Tonya Sadler Grayson, an executive director in the human resources department, served 12 months’ probation for misdemeanor charges when she was 19.

Grayson said it was a misunderstanding on her part. “When I read the questions on the application, I believed that my situation did not apply,” Grayson said in an email sent to DMN. “Upon notification, I fully disclosed the misdemeanor from when I was 19 years old to the district prior to my employment.”

The district’s human resources chief Carmen Darville defended Grayson in a email to the human resources staff on late Thursday, saying the issue was resolved. “Employees may disclose background information verbally or on their job application. When Tonya was made aware of the misdemeanor…she shared with me details of the incident.”

Peter Schulte, Liebbe’s lawyer, said his client had not been told why he was on leave. “I have asked repeatedly to be told what the allegations are,” Schulte said. “This causes me great concern with the integrity of the investigation.”

A source familiar with the investigation said a superior who often butted heads with Liebbe conducted the investigation without prior notice. The DMN added that private investigations are common in the district.

—  James Russell

Pride Recap: Rain hurts turnout; police make 2 arrests; Melrose may close lawn

Police respond to a disturbance in front of the Warwick Melrose Hotel during Sunday’s 29th annual Alan Ross Texas Freedom Parade. (John Wright/Dallas Voice)

The steady rain may not have dampened spirits during Dallas’ gay Pride parade on Sunday — but it did significantly reduce attendance at the event, according to police estimates.

DISD Detective Sgt. Jeremy Liebbe, who served as co-security liaison for the Dallas Pride parade and festival, said an estimated 25,000 people attended the Pride parade, down from an average of 35,000.

Liebbe said paid admission for the ensuing Pride Festival in Lee Park was 5,800 —roughly the same as last year but well below the 8,000 organizers had hoped for in 2012.

Michael Doughman, executive director of the Dallas Tavern Guild, which puts on the parade and festival, said despite the rain, he doesn’t believe revelers left disappointed.

“I think the rain was a frustration for people, but everybody seemed to be in a good mood,” he said. “I don’t think it really dampened the spirit of anybody who was there. … All in all, when you allow for the scenario when it’s going to rain, I still consider it a success.”

—  John Wright

Midway Hills hosts forum on intolerance

The Rev. Terry Zimmerman

Speakers focus on the impact of prejudice on the LGBT community

DAVID TAFFET | Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

The more that members of Midway Hills Christian Church talked about bullying, the more they realized how frequently the issue of religious intolerance came up, usually as the root of bullying.

“We saw it impacting people’s lives across the spectrum,” said Roger Wedell, an openly gay Midway Hills member.

And as the discussions continued, the more adamant the church members became about the necessity of finding ways to combat intolerance and bullying.

Out of those discussions was born the church’s new Tolerance Task Force.

The task force has since issued a Statement on Religious Intolerance and on June 12 hosted its first town hall on the subject. A second meeting will be held on Monday, June 20, and the public is invited to share their personal experiences.

The Rev. Terry Zimmerman, the senior minister at Midway Hills, called the statement “a call to solidarity of faith groups which present an alternative voice to the ones that speak the loudest and provide the most inflammatory sound bites for the media.”

But Zimmerman hopes the meetings result in more than just preaching to the choir.

“We’re hoping there are other groups out there as interested as we are, to form an alliance and share information,” he said.

Zimmerman said it’s the bad news that always makes headlines. But he recently attended a conference of clergy sponsored by Human Rights Campaign where he learned that studies show a majority of people want equal rights for everyone.

“That says to me they want tolerance,” Zimmerman said.

He said that recent events such as passage of anti-bullying legislation have helped bring his traditionally liberal congregation alive again.

“So much damage has been done in the name of religion,” Zimmerman said. “So many people have given up on church when it doesn’t stand up for what it knows is right.”

He and members of his congregation want to make sure, through the Tolerance Task Force, that people know Midway Hills does stand up for what they know is right.

“We’re hoping through this to let a broader spectrum of the community know there are other voices out there,” Wedell said.

Midway Hills has been an open and affirming congregation since the 1970s. When the AIDS crisis hit, they were one of the original churches that worked with AIDS Interfaith Network. Beginning in the early ’90s, they hosted P-FLAG, which met at the church for more than a decade. The church is a member of Disciples of Christ.

Just because there are louder voices that are intolerant, he said, doesn’t mean those are the only voice.

The first panel included two people who discussed the impact of intolerance.

One is Becky Holmes, a candidate for ordination at Brite Divinity School at Texas Christian University. She spoke about the impact intolerance has had on her, first as woman dealing with leadership of the Southern Baptist Church and then as a lesbian.

The other is Jeremy Liebbe, a volunteer with Youth First Texas who spoke on the struggle youth have with their sexual orientation and gender identity.

After surviving several suicide attempts, he assists other youth deal with the intolerance they face.

The upcoming panel includes three speakers. One is a counselor who works with Youth First Texas and will talk about youth issues.

In addition, Betsy Winter will discuss the journey of the Presbyterian Church to reach its new position on the ordination of gay and lesbian clergy, and Melissa Weaver, a staff attorney with Human Rights Initiative, will speak about the impact on immigrants seeking asylum.

Zimmerman said that at the first meeting, he felt a sense of helplessness that feeds on itself.

“We need to break that chain so people can be empowered,” he said. “We’re helping people find their voice.”

Midway Hills Christian Church, 11001 Midway Road, Monday, June 20 at 7 p.m.

—  John Wright