Lambda Legal slams Obama administration for appealing Witt’s DADT ruling

Via press release, here’s the very strong statement from the Legal Director of Lambda Legal, Jon Davidson (with my emphasis added):

“We congratulate Major Witt on her return to service and our colleagues at the ACLU of Washington who represented her. However, the decision to appeal by the Department of Justice leaves us wondering just what part of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Don’t Pursue’ does the Obama Administration not get? Notwithstanding President Obama’s concession that the military’s current anti-gay policies are hurting national security, his administration is continuing to pursue the discharge of a decorated officer who did not ‘tell,’ who would not have even been investigated under the military’s current guidelines, and whose discharge has been found not to promote unit cohesion or morale. While it is good that the administration decided not to seek a stay of Major Witt’s reinstatement, there was no necessity for an appeal to be filed, contrary to suggestions of Obama Administration representatives. After a trial, Major Witt was found to be ‘an exemplary officer,’ ‘an effective leader,’ ‘a caring mentor’ and ‘an integral member of an effective team,’ whose ‘loss within [her] squadron resulted in a diminution of the unit’s ability to carry out its mission.’ Filing this appeal and refusing to suspend discharges pending the repeal of the military’s current anti-gay policy is a significant failure on the part of our nation’s Commander in Chief.

We agree with Lambda Legal. Robert Gibbs was wrong. There was no necessity for this appeal to be filed. It’s is a significant failure.

Sign our letter to the President, urging him to become actively involved in the effort to pass the Defense bill with the DADT language. We’re running out of time — and we don’t need another significant failure. The letter is here.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  admin

Lambda Legal names Poindexter to head up regional office in Dallas

FROM STAFF REPORTS editor@dallasvoice.com

Roger Poindexter
Roger Poindexter

Officials with Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund announced this week that former national board member Roger Poindexter has been hired as director of the organization’s eight-state South Central Regional Office, located in Dallas.

Poindexter took over from interim Regional Director Charles MarLett on Nov. 1. He replaces Dennis Coleman, who left Lambda Legal in July to become executive director of Equality Texas, headquartered in Austin.

Poindexter comes to Lambda Legal after nearly three decades working in the information technology field. He served in various management roles within Hewlett Packard (formerly EDS) and co-chaired HP’s North Texas PRIDE Employee Resource Group.

Poindexter’s volunteer work for Lambda Legal began in 2002 when he joined the Dallas Leadership Committee. In 2004, he joined its National Board of Directors, where he served as co-chair of the Administration & Finance Committee and on the Executive Committee, before his term ended in February 2010.

In addition to his volunteer work for Lambda Legal, Poindexter has served on the boards of Dallas’ Cathedral of Hope and the Turtle Creek Chorale. He is also a former member of the Collin County Gay Lesbian Alliance Victory Committee.

“I originally became a Lambda Legal donor because I believe in the mission and the lasting impact the organization has made on the lives of LGBT people,” Poindexter said. “It’s the same reason I made the decision to take the next logical step of joining the staff. I’m looking forward to doing my part to expand the organization’s reach in the South Central Region.”

Lambda Legal Executive Director Kevin Cathcart said the organization is “delighted to welcome” Poindexter to the organization’s staff.

“But the truth is, he’s already been an integral part of the work we do,” Cathcart added. “We’re happy he’s decided to take over as head of our Dallas office.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 26, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Youth First Texas leader Sam Wilkes speaks from experience about the struggles of gay teens

Sam Wilkes speaks during the safe schools rally in Lake Cliff Park on Friday.

Sam Wilkes is development director and the only paid staff member at Youth First Texas.

On Sunday he appeared on Lambda Weekly to talk about bullying and how groups like YFT can help.

Wilkes said an estimated one-third to on- half of teen suicide attempts are by LGBTQ youth.

The Centers for Disease Control lists suicide as the third leading cause of death of people ages 15 to 24, just behind accidents and homicide. More than 4,000 young people commit suicide every year — that’s one every two hours.

According to estimates, 100 to 200 attempts are made for every actual suicide.

On Friday, at a rally in Lake Cliff Park in Oak Cliff to support safe schools, Wilkes spoke about the youth who attend YFT.

“These are youth who are marginalized and have no other place to turn,” he said. “In fact many of them are homeless because they feel they are safer on the streets than they are in their own homes.”

On Lambda Weekly, Wilkes told his own story and talked about why he’s so passionate about helping other young people.

When he was 18, Wilkes’ mother asked him whether he was gay. Although Wilkes knew he was different from the time he was 12, he wasn’t ready to come out. So he gave his mother an answer that was ambiguous and non-committal.

The next day, his mother handed him a letter that said he was no longer welcome in the house.

Wilkes was fortunate because he already had a job working at a restaurant. He had friends who let him crash on their sofa for several months until he could save enough for an apartment. On his own, he managed to finish school. To this day, he said, his relationship with his parents is nonexistent.

But not all youth are even as fortunate as he was, he said. He called his job at Youth First Texas the best opportunity anyone could have.

Wilkes said more than half of youth at YFT have contemplated or attempted suicide before coming to the center. But after they become involved at YFT and meet other LGBTQ youth, depression and risky behavior decreases tremendously.

—  David Taffet

BREAKING: Transgender girl not a finalist for homecoming queen despite enough votes

SISTERLY SUPPORT | Andy Moreno, left, has her family — including sister Daisy Moreno, right — and her friends backing her up in her bid to be the 2010 homecoming queen at North Dallas High. (Tammye Nash/Dallas Voice)
Andy Moreno, left, and her sister Daisy Moreno

Trangender student Andy Moreno wasn’t among the three finalists for homecoming queen at North Dallas High School announced Monday, according to her sister, Daisy Moreno.

Daisy Moreno told Instant Tea that according to poll watchers and friends on the counting committee, Andy received more votes than at least one of the three finalists. However, based on the principal’s previous decision, school officials didn’t allow votes for Andy to count.

Another transgender youth who also identifies as female was nominated for homecoming king and won, Daisy Moreno said. The school allowed the other youth to run for king because she was born male. Students will choose the homecoming king and queen from among the finalists on Friday, Oct. 15.

Queer LiberAction is reportedly planning a protest of Andy’s exclusion from the ballot.

The Canadian Broadcasting Company saw the story about Andy’s homecoming bid on Dallas Voice’s website and interviewed her Monday afternoon. The report is scheduled to run on NPR in the United States.

It’s unclear whether Andy would have a winning case if she brought legal action against the school or the district, according to Ken Upton, a senior staff attorney at Lambda Legal in Dallas.

Upton said recent federal court rulings have supported students’ right to dress consistently with their gender identity in other contexts, but he couldn’t recall one that dealt specifically with homecoming. In Indiana, for example, a school district recently changed its policies and settled a case brought by a trans student who wasn’t allowed to wear female attire to the prom.

“In this type of a situation, there would probably be some federal arguments you could make,” Upton said. “It would depend a lot on the circumstances of the homecoming event, and whether it was truly just extracurricular or whether it was related to the curriculum of the school. But as a general rule, the federal law has been in some cases protective of students who kind of buck the gender norms or bend the molds and administrators don’t like it.

“I think it’s something we’re seeing more and more of, because students are increasingly becoming comfortable in their own skin in situations where five or 10 years ago, they would have been scared to death to be themselves,” he said.

Upton added that regardless of the legal implications, he doesn’t understand the school’s motivation.

“What’s the harm?” Upton said. “Especially in the context of proms or homecoming, I always wonder, what really is the objection? And that’s the question that I’ve never gotten a satisfactory answer to. You [the school district] might win a lawsuit, but why would you care, and why would you expend so much energy on something like this? You’ve got bigger problems.”

Online editor John Wright contributed to this article.

—  David Taffet