Houston Aeros’ Justin Fontaine suspended for anti-gay tweet

Justin Fontaine

Houston’s American Hockey League team, the Aeros, has suspended player Justin Fontaine for two games after a homophobic tweet from the right winger.

The suspension was handed down from the Aeros’ parent NHL team the Minnesota Wild, who issued a press statement apologizing for Fontaine’s “inappropriate” comment.

Fontaine has since removed the offending tweet and tweeted an apology, saying “Twitter rookie and it came out totally wrong. It was a roommate battle, nothing more.” Missing from Fontaine’s apology was any recognition that it is cruel to use a term for queer people to deride something.

The issue is not that Fontaine used a naughty word, or that he did it in a public venue. The issue is that Fontaine seems to think that words meaning LGBT people are synonyms for “a thing I don’t like.” It’s hard to imagine that that equation does not stem from a dislike for LGBT people.

—  admin

If GOP wins House, there could be no defense bill, meaning no DADT repeal

This is extremely worrisome. We’ve been saying for almost two years that Obama and the Hill Democrats needed to deliver on their campaign promises, including the repeal of DADT. Instead, they dawdled. The White House refused to push the legislation until their hand was forced. Now, we’re reaching a critical point.

From Politico’s Morning Defense:

IF REPUBLICANS WIN THE HOUSE – Lobbyists predict that defense bills will come to a screeching halt, which could spell doom for the already controversial defense authorization bill. They provide a couple of reasons: The level of partisan bickering is likely to intensify, and waiting and letting Republicans handle those bills next year will allow the Democrats to play the blame game. The one kind of legislation that’s likely to move, insiders say, is a continuing resolution. To that end, the appropriations committees have drafted two – one that runs through Nov. 15 and another that will last until the end of January.

If there’s no defense authorization bill, there’s not going to be any DADT language this year. The House passed its version of the bill and it includes the compromise language (that language, concocted by Winnie Stachelberg at CAP, sets up a complicated process that doesn’t even establish an end date for the law.) The Senate Armed Services Committee added the compromise DADT language. But, the full Senate has yet to act. The Senate needs to take up the defense authorization bill as soon as they get back from the August recess. Then, that bill has to get to conference ASAP.

We can expect procedural shenanigans from John McCain and his GOP colleagues whenever the defense authorization bill hits the floor. He could filibuster the bill, move to strike the DADT language or try to amend the DADT language to include what SLDN calls the “killer amendment” of adding all the Service Chiefs to the certification process. All of these tactics could slow down final passage of the legislation. The way the schedule is now, even if everything goes according to plan, final passage wouldn’t take place until after the elections. That’s means we’re already in the lame duck session. As John explained last month, Democrats are already bending over backwards to assure Republicans they won’t pass legislation during the lame duck session. Now, we’re learning that there could be no authorization bill if the GOPers take the House.

So, yeah, the elections matter. We know that. But, we’ve been told we needed to elect Democrats in order to get the full repeal of DADT, passage of ENDA and repeal of DOMA. We did our part to help. And, what have we gotten? No ENDA. No DOMA repeal. And, we might get a law that starts the process of ending DADT.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

If GOP wins House, there could be no defense bill, meaning no DADT repeal

This is extremely worrisome. We’ve been saying for almost two years that Obama and the Hill Democrats needed to deliver on their campaign promises, including the repeal of DADT. Instead, they dawdled. The White House refused to push the legislation until their hand was forced. Now, we’re reaching a critical point.

From Politico’s Morning Defense:

IF REPUBLICANS WIN THE HOUSE – Lobbyists predict that defense bills will come to a screeching halt, which could spell doom for the already controversial defense authorization bill. They provide a couple of reasons: The level of partisan bickering is likely to intensify, and waiting and letting Republicans handle those bills next year will allow the Democrats to play the blame game. The one kind of legislation that’s likely to move, insiders say, is a continuing resolution. To that end, the appropriations committees have drafted two – one that runs through Nov. 15 and another that will last until the end of January.

If there’s no defense authorization bill, there’s not going to be any DADT language this year. The House passed its version of the bill and it includes the compromise language (that language, concocted by Winnie Stachelberg at CAP, sets up a complicated process that doesn’t even establish an end date for the law.) The Senate Armed Services Committee added the compromise DADT language. But, the full Senate has yet to act. The Senate needs to take up the defense authorization bill as soon as they get back from the August recess. Then, that bill has to get to conference ASAP.

We can expect procedural shenanigans from John McCain and his GOP colleagues whenever the defense authorization bill hits the floor. He could filibuster the bill, move to strike the DADT language or try to amend the DADT language to include what SLDN calls the “killer amendment” of adding all the Service Chiefs to the certification process. All of these tactics could slow down final passage of the legislation. The way the schedule is now, even if everything goes according to plan, final passage wouldn’t take place until after the elections. That’s means we’re already in the lame duck session. As John explained last month, Democrats are already bending over backwards to assure Republicans they won’t pass legislation during the lame duck session. Now, we’re learning that there could be no authorization bill if the GOPers take the House.

So, yeah, the elections matter. We know that. But, we’ve been told we needed to elect Democrats in order to get the full repeal of DADT, passage of ENDA and repeal of DOMA. We did our part to help. And, what have we gotten? No ENDA. No DOMA repeal. And, we might get a law that starts the process of ending DADT.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

Anita Staver gives new meaning to ‘tree hugger’

Anita-StaverThe following piece of “satire” comes from the mind and pen of Anita Staver, president of the anti-LGBT Liberty Counsel (and wife of Liberty Counsel chairman Mat Staver):

The Tree and I

Why I Want to Marry a Ficus

a satirical poem by

Anita L. Staver, Esq.

Oh how I love my ficus tree

It’s one with whom I long to be

I rub its bark and shine its green

It’s calm and never makes a scene

We’re quite content and never shout

When I stay out late it doesn’t pout

Or tell me how to spend my money

It leans toward me and I call it “honey”

It fills a special place in my heart

I promise that we will never part

I can even quote a Bible verse

Of the fig tree that Jonah loved first

Now there’s a judge on the west coast

I know he’ll give what I want most

To marry my precious ficus tree

Me, a ficus and baby makes three

This may never become a trend

So I may tire of my woody friend

And if I decide to give up my Mister

The judge would then let me marry my sister!

Yup, you read that right: She just compared gay people’s marriages to that which might exist between a human and a topiary tree, as well as that which could possibly go down between a person and his or her sibling. Plus she reduced a judge’s 136-page, completely thought out and reasoned opinion to little more than an activist whim that will allow any sort of request regardless of demonstrated merit. Which of course makes it sound as if pro-equality lawyers haven’t had to do their hard work, as well as excuses the piss poor anti-LGBT court showing that both we and Liberty Counsel have criticized. All off-base attack positions, slipped in under the cover of “satire.”

Not to mention, Anita totally offended our taste. I mean a ficus? Really? Pscha! Everyone knows that we gays only pine for oaks! Or the occasional Willow, in the case of lesbians.

But hey, this is just one fringe voice. It’s not like Anita is someone who gets booked on mainstream television programs or anything, right?

Oh.

***

*One more thing: It’s probably not the smartest thing for an evangelical Christian to attack tree love, considering that religion’s most major holiday is centered around making a Fraser Fir look all pretty and sparkly. This writer lives in New York City not far from Rockefeller Center: I see this major tree fetish up close!




Good As You

—  John Wright

Dallas could elect 1st gay judge

Judicial candidates John Loza, Tonya Parker among 4 LGBTs running in local races in 2010

By John Wright | News Editor wright@dallasvoice.com
IN THE RUNNING | Dallas County District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons, clockwise from top left, County Judge Jim Foster, attorney Tonya Parker and former Councilman John Loza are LGBT candidates who plan to run in Dallas County elections in 2010. The filing period ends Jan. 4.

Dallas County has had its share of openly gay elected officials, from Sheriff Lupe Valdez to District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons to County Judge Jim Foster.
But while Foster, who chairs the Commissioners Court, is called a “judge,” he’s not a member of the judiciary, to which the county’s voters have never elected an out LGBT person.

Two Democrats running in 2010 — John Loza and Tonya Parker — are hoping to change that.

“This is the first election cycle that I can remember where we’ve had openly gay candidates for the judiciary,” said Loza, a former Dallas City Councilman who’s been involved in local LGBT politics for decades. “It’s probably long overdue, to be honest with you.”

Dallas County’s Jerry Birdwell became the first openly gay judge in Texas when he was appointed by Gov. Ann Richards in 1992. But after coming under attack for his sexual orientation by the local Republican Party, Birdwell, a Democrat, lost his bid for re-election later that year.

Also in the November 1992 election, Democrat Barbara Rosenberg defeated anti-gay Republican Judge Jack Hampton.

But Rosenberg, who’s a lesbian, wasn’t out at the time and didn’t run as an openly LGBT candidate.

Loza, who’s been practicing criminal law in Dallas for the last 20 years, is running for the County Criminal Court No. 5 seat. Incumbent Tom Fuller is retiring. Loza said he expects to face three other Democrats in the March primary, meaning a runoff is likely. In addition to groups like Stonewall Democrats of Dallas, he said he’ll seek an endorsement from the Washington, D.C.-based Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, which provides financial backing to LGBT candidates nationwide.

Parker, who’s running for the 116th Civil District Court seat, declined to be interviewed for this story. Incumbent Bruce Priddy isn’t expected to seek re-election, and Parker appears to be the favorite for the Democratic nomination.

If she wins in November, Parker would become the first LGBT African-American elected official in Dallas County.

Loza and Parker are among four known local LGBT candidates in 2010.
They join fellow Democrats Fitzsimmons and Foster, who are each seeking a second four-year term.

While Foster is vulnerable and faces two strong challengers in the primary, Fitzsimmons is extremely popular and said he’s confident he’ll be re-elected.

“I think pretty much everybody knows that the District Clerk’s Office is probably the best-run office in Dallas County government,” Fitzsimmons said. “I think this county is a Democratic County, and I think I’ve proved myself to be an outstanding county administrator, and I think the people will see that.”

Randall Terrell, political director for Equality Texas, said this week he wasn’t aware of any openly LGBT candidates who’ve filed to run in state races in 2010.

Although Texas made headlines recently for electing the nation’s first gay big-city mayor, the state remains one of 20 that lack an out legislator.

Denis Dison, a spokesman for the Victory Fund, said he’s hoping Annise Parker’s victory in Houston last week will inspire more qualified LGBT people to run for office.

“It gives other people permission really to think of themselves as leaders,” Dison said.

The filing period for March primaries ends Jan. 4.


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 18, 2009.

—  admin