'Polite society' in New Hampshire

Lawmakers in the New Hampshire House of Representatives are set to vote today on a proposal to rescind that state’s law legalizing same-sex marriage, and a proposal to amend the state’s Constitution to limit legal marriage to opposite-sex couples.

The House Judiciary Committee has recommended voting down both bills.

Gay marriage opponents who are backing the measures say that voters, not legislators, should be the ones to decide the matter. But — and this is the part that really caught my attention — they also say, “the consummation of gay unions can’t be spoken of in polite society” (as per an Associated Press report).

You’re kidding me, right? You shouldn’t talk about gay sex at tea parties, so gay marriage shouldn’t be allowed? That’s their argument? I guess hetero sex is a perfectly fine topic for “polite society” in New Hampshire?

And here’s what makes it even better. N.H. State Rep. Nancy Elliott, earlier this week, explained her opposition to gay marriage during a Judiciary Committee Hearing by giving a very graphic description of anal sex, and then claiming that fifth graders in the Nashua school are, as part of their sex education class, now being shown graphic photos of two men engaged in anal sex, and told that they should try it. All because gay marriage is legal.

Of course, that crap about the school’s isn’t true, and Elliott had to admit that in a public statement issued yesterday. Still, she said it. And here’s the video to prove it.

—  admin

Gay legislators – we need to get us one

This state house has more LGBT legislators than any other
This state house has more LGBT legislators than any other

Yesterday, I wrote about a Utah state representative who is lesbian and acting as surrogate mother for a gay couple. What I thought was interesting was that she was one of three openly gay legislators in that very red state. Yet Texas has none. How are other states doing?

According to the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, 79 LGBT legislators serve in state houses across the country. Here are some of the stats I came up with:

28 states have at least one LGBT legislator.

The state with the most is no surprise: Massachusetts has six. Marriage equality. Sky not fallen. Even has an openly gay Republican running for lieutenant governor. Elaine Noble was the first open gay or lesbian elected to a state legislature in the United States. In 1975, she was elected to the Massachusetts State House.

States with five LGBT legislators are mostly no surprise: Arizona, Connecticut, New York, Vermont, Washington state. Connecticut and Vermont have marriage equality. Washington has an equality law that gives domestic partners everything that marriage does, but with a different name. New York recognizes marriages performed elsewhere. Arizona is a purple state. John McCain is one of their senators. Republican John Kyl is the other. But Janet Napolitano was their governor and now serves in Obama’s cabinet. It’s only only state to have had three women governors in a row. (Jane Hull preceeded Napolitano and Jan Brewer is the current governor).

Three states have four LGBT legislators: California, Maryland and New Hampshire. New Hampshire has marriage equality. California has thousands of legally married couples and Prop. 8 currently is tied up in court. Maryland does not ban marriage equality and they tried but failed to pass it last session.

In addition to Utah, Rhode Island has three gay legislators. Despite a governor who killed marriage equality last year and vetoed a bill that would allow gays or lesbians to make funeral arrangements for their partners, the state is generally very blue. The legislature overrode the governor’s veto and the mayor of Providence is also gay.

Texas? Glen Maxey was one of the first openly gay state legislators nationally. But since he left office, we’ve had none.

—  David Taffet

What does marriage equality cost?

Finance reports were released. Supporters of same-sex marriage outspent anti-gay bigots in Maine, according to the Nashua Telegraph in neighboring New Hampshire.

The pro-marriage side wasted $5.8 million trying to achieve equality. The anti-marriage side spent only $3.8 million to preserve discrimination against gays and lesbians.

In New Hampshire, marriage equality, which was signed into law last summer, goes into effect on Jan. 1.

In Washington, D.C., marriage equality was voted into law by an 11-2 majority by the city council.

Note: No one reading this can accuse me of being the biased, liberal media.

—  David Taffet