Transgender center launches intersex group

When a baby is born the first question most people ask is “is it a girl or a boy?” The doctor takes a look at the baby’s genitals, if they see a penis the child is declared a boy, if the see a vulva the child is called a girl. But sometimes a child’s anatomy is not that clear cut, and sometimes the genetics, physiology or anatomy of person is more complex than the penis=boy, vulva=girl equation. The umbrella term “intersex” is used to describe people whose physical bodies, hormones or chromosomes lie between the male and female ends of the spectrum.

According to the Intersex Society of North America somewhere between 1 in 1,500 and 1 in 2,000 babies born in this country have genitals that fall between the strict male/female dichotomy. Additionally, several genetic conditions exist where people who may appear strictly male or strictly female have chromosomal combinations other than XX or XY, a combination of XX and XY, or the chromosomes associated with one gender and the body associated with another. With so many intersex people walking around, there is a fairly good chance that you know one.

But according to “Koomah,” the founder of the group, very few spaces exist for intersex people to talk about their lives. “Most of the social and support groups that I’ve encountered are online,” says Koomah. “I’ve encountered a handful of people both in and outside of [Houston's] Transgender Center that are intersex-bodied but didn’t know anyone else who was. When I mentioned I was and spoke with them more in depth about my experience it seemed to be a great relief that their experience isn’t the only one.”

Koomah realised that their was a need for a group that would allow the intersex community to talk about their experiences. This realization led to the founding of the Transgender Centers Intersex group, which will have its first meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 7 pm at the Center (604 Pacific). The group is designed as an informal get-to-gether for those with intersex bodies and their spouses.

Koomah explains that while the transgender and intersex communities share many experiences the terms are not interchangeable. “While some intersex people do identify as transgender and some may choose to transition, sometimes the experience of being intersex is different,” says Kumayama. “Being intersex in childhood is radically different than the experience of other non-intersex folks, explaining your body to doctors can be scary, and making choices on things like transition or relationships are easier when you have people whom you share similar experience to talk with.”

—  admin

Victory in HCC trans discrimination case (sort of)

As previously reported by our friends over at the Dallas Voice, in September a Houston Community College teacher, Donny Leveston, led an in-class conversation about “Taboo: Incest and Homoeroticism” in which transgender people were referred to as “freaks” and “weirdos.” In an official response from the HCC Office of Institutional Equality the school admitted that the instructor acted insensitively and failed to show proper concern for a transgender student in the class who later withdrew from the school over the incident. Despite this, HCC found that Leveston did not violate the school’s policy against Discrimination and Harassment and will not be disciplined or required to attend training on transgender issues.

—  admin

Step aside Vajazzler, the Pejazzler comes to town!

Face to Face NYC didn’t have any photos of pejazzled members on their website that I saw, but they did have this one delcaring “Beauty Talks.” Get Pejazzled at the spa, and your “beauty” can be shouting “Bling Bling.”

I have a friend who is very involved in community theater (she and her husband recently moved to Los Angeles so she can pursue her acting career), and she and her sister often helped sew costumes for different area theaters. We used to kid her all the time about her love of the Bedazzler, that wonderful little device that lets you add sparkle to everything,

Then Jennifer Love Hewitt went on Lopez Tonight and told everybody how she had bedazzled her va-jay-jay. Vajazzling, she said, was all the rage. (I can assure you, that was news to me!)

I guess some of the menfolk out there were feeling a bit left out, because today in my email inbox I found an announcement from Face to Face NYC, “a boutique spa in Manhattan,” letting me know that they now offer Pejazzling services. Yep, that’s right. Go to New York City, visit Face to Face spa, and you, too, can have a sparkly penis. (I checked their website, though, and didn’t find any photos of sparkly penises.)

According to this email: “Pejazzle is the newest emerging trend in men’s grooming. Every man can enjoy adorning his ‘special friend’ with Swarovski crystals and transform his member into a dazzling Pejazzle piece!  The treatment can be done very easily and quickly. Enrique Ramirez of Face to Face spa NYC shares that he is excited about this new trend for men following his pioneering introduction of the Vajazzle for his female customers.  His male patrons love this novelty treatment and there are great designs men can choose from that are gender appropriate… and some that aren’t!”

Pejazzling, they suggest, would be a great idea for brides and grooms or grooms and grooms on their wedding nights, as a way to spice up anniversaries and special dates or just for a bit of self indulgence.

I am not so sure about that. I am afraid that if I were the type to date or marry a man, and my date or husband whipped out his Pejazzled member, I might get tickled and laugh so hard the special occasion would be ruined. Then again, as a lesbian, maybe I’m not the one to judge (although I think a vajazzled va-jay-jay would get the same response from me.)

What do you think? Would you be turned on, turned off or overcome with laughter?

—  admin

Huge smoke penis looms over DFW

Stumbled upon this image tonight on the Weather Undergound site. Not to make light of the situation out west, but it is rather phallic.

—  John Wright