UPDATE on Brenda Namigadde: Deportation delayed by temporary injunction

As I noted here earlier, Ugandan lesbian Brenda Namigadde — who fled to the U.K. in 2002 to escape persecution in her home country where homosexuality is outlawed with those who break that law subject to up to 14 years in prison — was scheduled to be sent back to Uganda at 9 p.m. tonight (London time). But word now is that a High Court judge has granted a temporary injunction preventing her deportation, according to reports by BBC.

Namigadde’s earlier pleas for asylum in the U.K. had been denied after a judge said there was no evidence she is a lesbian.

Efforts to halt Namigadde’s deportation took on added urgency on Wednesdays after news broke of the murder of Uganda’s most prominent gay rights activist, David Kato.

—  admin

Gay Brazilian married in U.S. may face deportation

RUSSELL CONTRERAS | Associated Press

BOSTON — A Brazilian man who was recently reunited with his Massachusetts husband when federal officials temporarily allowed him into the U.S. said he could face deportation because the attorney general won’t reverse the immigration ruling that initially separated the couple.

Genesio Oliveira, 31, said Monday, Nov. 8 that he could be forced to return to Brazil in six months because of Eric Holder’s decision.

“I was very depressed,” Oliveira said in a telephone interview. “I’m terrified. I thought this would be over by now.”

Three years ago, Oliveira and husband Tim Coco, 49, of Haverhill, were forced to live apart when Oliveira was denied asylum over claims he was raped as a teenager. A judge found Oliveira’s fear of returning to Brazil “genuine,” but ruled he was never physically harmed by the rape.

The Associated Press does not typically name rape victims, but Oliveira speaks openly about his case and allows his name to be used.

The case gained international attention from gay rights and immigrant advocates who criticized U.S. officials for separating a legally married couple.

In June, at U.S. Sen. John Kerry’s urging, federal officials temporarily allowed Oliveira back in the country on humanitarian grounds.

Following his return to Massachusetts, Oliveira said the couple believed Holder would reverse the initial immigration decision. Oliveira, whose nickname is “Junior,” said that would have allowed him to apply for permanent residency in the U.S. either on the basis of his marriage or as an asylum-seeker who feels threatened by anti-gay violence in his country.

Although Brazil is one of Latin America’s most tolerant countries toward gays, a number of Brazilian gays have persuaded U.S. judges to grant them asylum on the grounds they would face persecution if sent home.

“I think (Holder) was never able to help us,” said Oliveira. “He has all the authority to help us and he doesn’t want to.”

The U.S. attorney general’s office did not immediately return e-mails and phone messages Monday.

Last year, Kerry asked Holder to grant Oliveira asylum on humanitarian grounds. Then in March, Kerry wrote Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano asking her to issue Oliveira “humanitarian parole” based on his fear of persecution in Brazil.

Humanitarian parole is used sparingly to temporarily allow someone who is otherwise inadmissible into the U.S. for a compelling emergency, according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

A spokeswoman for Kerry said the senator was in Beirut and couldn’t immediately comment.

Coco said the couple is looking at all available options now, including trying to reapply for asylum, suing the federal government over the Defense of Marriage Act, or trying to convince lawmakers to pass a federal bill that would allow Oliveira to stay.

“But each one of those options come with risks,” said Coco. “Junior could be forced to go back.”

—  John Wright

Castro sorry for persecution of gays in Cuba

Fidel Castro

The latest country to talk about legalizing same-sex marriage will not become the new gay and lesbian travel destination anytime soon.

What is the latest country to talk about legalizing same-sex unions? That bastion of civil rights — Cuba.

Fidel Castro has been out of the spotlight for several years but recently made some public appearances. Asked about gays and lesbians, he apologized for past mistreatment.

In an interview on Radio Cadena Agramonte, Castro took responsibility for persecution of gays and lesbians after the 1959 revolution.

“Five decades ago, because of homophobia, homosexuals were marginalized in Cuba and many were sent to agricultural or military labor camps, accused of being “counterrevolutionaries,” he said. “We had so many terrible problems, problems of life or death, you know, you do not pay enough attention.”

He said personally he had no prejudice and that many of his oldest friends were gay and lesbian.

But he said, “No, if someone is responsible (for the discrimination) it is me.”

Homosexuality was decriminalized in Cuba in the 1990s, and sex-reassignment surgery for transgenders began being performed free in 2008.

The slogan for the last World Day Against Homophobia in Cuba was “La homosexualidad no es un peligro, la homofobia sí” or “Homosexuality is not a threat, homophobia is.”

—  David Taffet

Fidel Castro: Blame Me For Cuba’s Persecution of Queers

If anyone is responsible (for the persecution), it's me. I'm not going to place the blame on others. … We had so many and such terrible problems, problems of life or death In those moments I was not able to deal with that matter (of homosexuals). I found myself immersed, principally, in the Crisis of October (Cuban Missile Crisis), in the war, in policy questions.

—Fidel Castro, accepting blame for labeling Cuban gays "counterrevolutionaries" and shipping many off to work camps, and insisting it is not the fault of the state's Communist Party at large while trying to explain why he let the discrimination take place [via]


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Queerty

—  John Wright

Fidel Castro: I Take Responsibility For Cuba’s Persecution Of Gays

Calling it a “great injustice,” today Fidel Castro told a Mexican newspaper that he accepts responsibility for Cuba’s persecution of its gay citizens, thousands of whom were rounded up and placed in internment camps during his regime.

Castro said that the revolutionary government’s actions represented “a great injustice – a great injustice! – whoever committed it. If we committed it, we committed it. I am trying to limit my responsibility in all that because, of course, personally I don’t have that type of prejudice.” The interviewer paraphrases him as saying that “everything came about as a spontaneous reaction in the revolutionary ranks that came from the nation’s traditions. In the old Cuba, blacks were not the only ones discriminated against; there was discrimination against women and, of course, homosexuals.” Was the Communist Party to blame, the interviewer asks. “No,” Castro responds. “If anyone is responsible, I am. True, at that time I couldn’t concern myself with the subject. I was deeply and mainly involved in the October Crisis, the war, the political issues. But in the end, if responsibility must be assumed, I assume mine. I’m not going to blame others,” Castro says.

Many will likely credit Castro’s niece Mariela for today’s statement as she has led Cuba’s burgeoning LGBT rights movement in recent years. Havana has staged gay pride parades for the last two years.

Joe. My. God.

—  John Wright