Department of Education to include gender identity in national bullying and hate crimes survey

(David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

NLGBTQ Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics has announced it will include gender identity in the 2016 School Survey on Crime and Safety.

The survey, which already includes sexual orientation in its data, examines bullying and hate crimes in the nation’s schools.

LGBT youth, especially transgender and gender nonconforming students, are more likely to be bullied and harassed than their peers. According to the Human Rights Campaign, LGB youth are twice as likely to experience bullying than their heterosexual peers. The numbers are higher for transgender and gender nonconforming youth compared to their cisgender and LGB peers.

“The new language in the School Survey on Crime and Safety will help protect LGBTQ students from bullying and harassment and will allow us to better understand the challenges they face. Reliable data on what motivates bullying and hate crimes will help educators and lawmakers prevent harassment and violence that disproportionately affect LGBTQ students,” said Rea Carey, Executive Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force. ”We thank the Department of Education for its work to prevent anti-LGBTQ bullying in schools and look forward to continuing to work with President Obama and the administration.”

 

—  James Russell

EEOC rules federal law prohibits discrimination based on a sexual orientation

US-EEOC-Seal_380w_crop380wThe Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ruled this week existing civil rights laws protect discrimination based on sexual orientation.

In the 3-2 decision, commissioners ruled the sex discrimination provisions of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act protect employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation.

The independent federal commission is one of the nation’s enforcers and interpreters of federal nondiscrimination laws.

“This landmark opinion from the EEOC confirms what we have long argued in our cases: discriminating against gay, lesbian and bisexual employees violates federal law. This ruling is likely to have enormous positive effects because EEOC interpretations of Title VII are highly persuasive to the courts — they tend to be predictive,” said Greg Nevins, Counsel and Employment Fairness Strategist for Lambda Legal in a statement.

The decision should serve as precedent for future court decisions, he said.

“Given the clarity and logic of this opinion, most courts are likely to stop simply referring to old, illogical rulings about Title VII coverage. A few may disagree, but most probably will be guided by the Commission’s straightforward approach.”

In 2012, the EEOC ruled discrimination against a transgender individual is also protected under Title VII in the case Macy v. Department of Justice.

“Freedom to Work applauds this historic decision by the EEOC, and we encourage gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals who face harassment or discrimination on the job to consult an attorney and file Title VII claims with the EEOC and eventually the federal courts,” Tico Almeida, the group’s president said in a statement.

He urged LGBT activists to take further claims of nondiscrimination to the federal courts “to win workplace protections in all fifty states.”

Currently 31 states, including Texas, lack employment and housing protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity, according to a new report from the Human Rights Campaign.

Rea Carey, National LGBTQ Task Force Executive Director agreed with Almeida.

“This is another historic victory for LGBTQ people and their families. We need to further attack the scourge of discrimination in a comprehensive manner — and while LGBTQ people may file employment discrimination cases with the EEOC, we still need more. We must push for legislation that provides clear and strong protections for all LGBTQ people in every area of life — from housing to health care,” she said in a statement.

—  James Russell

Rea Carey lays out agenda at Creating Change

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Rea Carey

National LGBTQ Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey spoke today (Friday, Feb. 6), at Creating Change in Denver, setting out an agenda as the movement achieves one goal: marriage equality.

Among the top items on the agenda is to secure nondiscrimination protections that protect our lives without broad religious exemptions.

“I don’t become less of a human if your humanity is recognized,” Carey said.

Ending policies that criminalize our lives, such as criminalizing people with HIV or using condoms as evidence that a trans person is a sex worker, is another Task Force goal.

Carey also called racial profiling an LGBTQ issue that must be stopped. She spoke about Ty Underwood, the trans woman killed in Tyler, and called hate against the trans community an epidemic.

—  David Taffet

PHOTOS: Creating Change 2014 in Houston

Nona Hendryx performs Sunday at Creating Change in Houston. (Anna Waugh/Dallas Voice)

Nona Hendryx performs Sunday at Creating Change in Houston. (Anna Waugh/Dallas Voice)

 HOUSTON — Thousands of LGBT advocates departed from Houston Sunday as the 26th annual National Conference on LGBT Equality: Creating Change came to a close.

The annual five-day conference set records for the amount of attendees and workshops in its first year in Houston. And the inspiration of the weekend was all around during the conference, from Houston Mayor Annise Parker’s welcome to trans actress Laverne Cox’s keynote speech and National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Executive Director Rea Carey’s State of the Movement address. (If you missed any of the speeches, you can watch them here.)

And, like any celebration in the LGBT community, it ended with a bang as bisexual singer Nona Hendryx rocked out on stage on Sunday after brunch.

More photos below.

—  Dallasvoice

Task Force’s Rea Carey says to keep momentum going to create more change

Rea Carey, executiove director of the Natinla Gay and Lesbian Task Force, speaks about the future of the LGBT movement at  the Creating Change conference in Houston. (Jessica Borges/Dallas Voice)

Rea Carey, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, speaks about the future of the LGBT movement at the Creating Change conference in Houston. (Jessica Borges/Dallas Voice)

HOUSTON — Rea Carey expects the momentum from 2013 to carry over and encourage more change and success for the LGBT community this year in areas like immigration reform, healthcare coverage and nondiscrimination legislation.

Carey, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, called on the 4,000 people at the National Conference for LGBT Equality: Creating Change to reflect on the advances last year and fight for more in the coming months during her State of the Movement speech on Friday.

“2013 showed us and this country that the wins of 2012 weren’t a fluke,” Carey said. “The momentum is in favor of progressive change. We are here to stay, our progress will continue and we will not allow this country to turn back.”

—  Dallasvoice

Rea Carey's 'State of the Movement' address

Rea Carey, executive director of National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, delivered the “State of the Movement” address at Creating Change. Here it is in four parts, about 40 minutes and worth watching if you missed it.

Part 1

(three more parts after the jump)

—  David Taffet

Creating Change: Rea Carey calls out Obama in annual State of the Movement Address

(David Taffet/Dallas Voice)
NGLTF Executive Director Rea Carey delivers her State of the Movement Address on Friday afternoon during the Creating Change conference at the Sheraton hotel in downtown Dallas. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

Rea Carey, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, called out President Barack Obama today during her annual State of the Movement Address, delivered at NGLTF’s Creating Change conference in Dallas.

Speaking to a crowd of thousands at the Sheraton hotel downtown, Carey recalled that a year ago, the LGBT community was filled with hope following the election of Obama and a new Congress.

But Carey said Obama has failed to live up to his campaign promise of being a “fierce advocate” for LGBT equality.

“We were eager to see what a fierce advocate could do, but now it’s a year into this new administration, it’s a year into this new Congress,” Carey said. “There have been glimmers of advocacy, but certainly not fierceness. Speeches aren’t change. Change is more than words. Change is action.”

As an example, Carey pointed to “don’t ask, don’t tell,” the military’s ban on openly gay servicemembers.

Obama has repeatedly said he favors repealing the ban, including during his recent State of the Union Address. This week, the nation’s two top military commanders told Congress they’ll conduct a yearlong study to determine how the DADT repeal should be implemented.

“Let me be clear — a yearlong study does not a fierce advocate make,” Carey said Friday. “A year is far too long to wait, and it’s time the president used the executive branch to stop these discharges now, while the military and Congress move to bring this shameful and discriminatory chapter of U.S. history to an end. Mr. President, the ball’s in your court. You have the opportunity to go down in history as one of the few presidents who acted decisively to move human rights forward.”

Carey added that Congress should be held “equally if not more accountable” than Obama, and she said it will ultimately be up to the community to “create change.”

“We thought we were finally going to have leadership that would stand with us, work with us and for us, but that hasn’t fully happened yet, and so it’s still up to us to push and in fact, to lead,” she said.

To read a full transcript of Carey’s remarks, go here.как проверить сайт на индексацию

—  John Wright

Creating Change: Day 3

Rebecca Voelkel and Pedro Julio Serrano at Creating Change
Rebecca Voelkel and Pedro Julio Serrano at Creating Change

I’m on my way down to the Sheraton Hotel for more of the great Creating Change conference. Meeting so many activists from across the country has been exhilirating.

On tap today – lots and lots of workshops. The hospitality suites are open. Great place to stop by for just a few minutes or for an extended period to meet people from across the country.

At 1:30, one of the conference highlights takes place. Rea Carey, executive director of NGLTF, delivers the state of the movement address.

And I have to extend a personal welcome to everyone to Shabbat services tonight at 7:30. I’ll be co-leading with Congregation Beth El Binah president Diane Litke. Everyone is welcome and you do not need to be registered at the conference to attend.

Should be lots of fun to share shabbat (dont worry – we spent more time worrying about the food than the service) with activists from across the country. And in case you’re worried that Jewish services tend to drag on and on and on, we only have the room for ONE HOUR. Gregg Drinkwater and Rabbi Joshua Lesser of Atlanta, editors of the new book “Torah Queeries,” will be speaking at the service (so no, you don’t have to listen to me rant and rave).что такое seo

—  David Taffet