Our best and worst at the Oscars

OK, so we can all probably agree that the worst thing at the Oscars wasn’t on the red carpet — it was Seth MacFarlane’s tone-deaf jokes about Quvenzhane Wallis and other celebs that fell flat. Well, maybe you did like him, or even Jennifer Lawrence winning for the godawful Silver Linings Playbook.

Well, whatever you thought of the ceremony, here’s what our fashionista, J. Denton Bricker, thought of the best and worst ladies’ wear of the evening. Feel free to disagree or add your own.

BEST

DARREN LE GALLO, AMY ADAMSJESSICA CHASTAINNAOMI WATTS Amy Adams — The shape of her pale blue Oscar de la Renta was dazzling with every shot from the front row.

Jessica Chastain — The shimmering Art Deco design (also from Armani Prive) conjured images of Old Hollywood, including Marilyn.

Naomi Watts — This sharp silver number from Armani Prive looked like nothing else on the red carpet and seemed to catch color.

REESE WITHERSPOONWILLIAM GOLDENBERG, SANDRA BULLOCK

Reese Witherspoon — The form-fitting cobalt gown by Louis Vuitton was sleek and classic with a little edge. Her vintage locks were the best of the evening.

Sandra Bullock — Elegant, effortless and breathtaking in Ellie Saab, who wouldn’t want to receive an award from her?

WORST

MELISSA MCCARTHYANNE HATHAWAYHelena-Bonham-Carter

Melissa McCarthy — The effort was there, but the grey blob of a dress from David Meister just didn’t work.

Anne Hathaway — The pale pink Prada fit Anne awkwardly and accentuated her breasts in all the wrong, pointed ways.

Helena Bonham Carter — Known for her eccentric tastes, the spooky Vivienne Westwood was just wrong for the Oscar red carpet.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Arts District pairs with Dallas Film Society for Sunset Screening series

‘Waiting for Guffman’ screens Sept. 17, just in time for Dallas Pride weekend.

The AT&T Performing Arts Center and the Dallas Film Society introduce a series of Sunset Screenings at Annette Strauss Artists Square alongside the Winspear Opera House, showing movies for free monthly all summer. It starts this Saturday.

Five hundred reserved seats are available with your RSVP, with lawn seating (blankets only; no portable chairs allowed) available as well. Coolers and strollers are not permitted, but concessions will be available.

The schedule is below:

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

A curtain falls

Propmaster Rick Gilles, DTC’s butchest employee, leaves to be with his man

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Rick Gilles
GO WEST | While finishing up work at DTC’s production studio, Gilles is planning his big move to California — for love. (Rich Lopez/Dallas Voice)

Two loves separated by long distance. One left for his future. The other stayed for their future. But now, happily ever after is about to begin.

Quick, what is that? Tagline in a movie trailer for the next sappy Reese Witherspoon rom-com? No, but it is based on a true story. After 14 years in Dallas, Rick Gilles is packing up and heading west to be with his partner Shannon Swindle. Once they are reunited after a year-and-a-half separation, the plan for Gilles is to settle in, get a job and begin planning their wedding next year (initially scheduled for this year). It’s a real-world romance just in time for Prop 8 being overturned.

“I started realizing that I wasn’t going to get the wedding I wanted,” Gilles laughs. “We had been talking about it for a little while, but with the stress of moving, we postponed until next year. We want it outdoors in Napa Valley with close family and friends. And that isn’t going to come particularly cheap.”

Swindle built a sweet reputation as the pastry chef at Craft in Dallas’ W Hotel, but last year he was transferred to the Los Angeles location. He’s been living in an apartment, waiting for Gilles. But as the properties master for the Dallas Theater Center, Gilles had his own full plate — namely, moving into the new Wyly Theatre. After 14 seasons working at the DTC, he couldn’t bring himself to just leave without seeing it flourish.

“Part of the reason the move didn’t happen earlier was I had been working on getting this theater open,” he says. “I really wanted to see that to fruition and see it go through a full season.”

When Gilles wasn’t constructing sets and working on props for the stage, he was an active member of the Leather Knights (see sidebar), where he found something beyond his leather interest: He could also make an impact on the local LGBT community that he doesn’t foresee in L.A.
“When I lived there before it took a lot more effort, time and money to be involved,” he says. “With Leather Knights, I could fit into my schedule and help the community and contribute my talents.”

Perhaps the hardest part of Gilles’ move isn’t just leaving his longtime tenure at DTC, but chiefly because, he isn’t all that ready to leave Dallas. Coming here from Buffalo (though originally from California), Gilles has made his connection to the city.

“I’ll be really sad to leave here,” he admits. “Dallas has treated me exceptionally well. I love this job and I love Dallas a lot. But ultimately, I’m really excited about the future. We’ve been living apart long enough.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 6, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens