WATCH: Barney Frank on coming out

Via ThinkProgress, above is a clip of Congressman Barney Frank, D-Mass., talking about his decision to come out as gay in 1987, during a press conference today where he announced that he won’t seek re-election next year. According to the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, Frank was the second openly gay person to serve in Congress. The first was Rep. Gerry Studds, D-Mass., who came out in 1983 while in office. Via Pam’s House Blend, below is the full written statement sent out by Frank’s office today:

I will not be a candidate for reelection to the House of Representatives in 2012.

I began to think about retirement last year, as we were completing passage of the financial reform bill. I have enjoyed—indeed been enormously honored—by the chance to represent others in Congress and the State Legislature, but there are other things I hope to do before my career ends. Specifically, I have for several years been thinking about writing, and while there are people who are able to combine serious writing with full-time jobs, my susceptibility to distraction when faced with a blank screen makes that impossible.

In 2010, after the bill was signed into law, I had tentatively decided to make this my last term. The end of next year will mark 40 years during which time I have held elected office and a period of 45 years since I first went to work in government full time as an aide to Mayor Kevin White in late 1967.

But with the election of a conservative majority in the House, I decided that my commitment to the public policies for which I have fought for 45 years required me to run for one more term. I was—and am—concerned about right-wing assaults on the financial reform bill, especially since we are now in a very critical period when the bill is in the process of implementation. In addition, recognizing that there is a need for us to do long-term deficit reduction, I was—and am—determined to do everything possible to make sure that substantial reduction in our excessive overseas military commitments forms a significant part of the savings over the next 10 years.

—  John Wright