Best bets • 01.06.12

Friday 01.06

Harnessing a bargain
With the economy being such a bitch, you gotta find a good deal anywhere. That goes for leather masters and mistresses as well. New and used items go on the block at the Leather Silent Auction benefiting local groups. And if you can snag a harness, some paddles or a pair of boots for cheaper than usual, jump on it fast.

DEETS: Dallas Eagle, 5740 Maple Ave.  7–11 p.m. DallasEagle.com.

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Tuesday 01.10

Pecha what?
Pecha Kucha Dallas starts 2012 with the appropriately titled theme: A Clean Slate. A panel of speakers cover topics on helping build a new you.

OK, it sounds self-helpy, but PK’s structure keeps it tight and speakers cover a lot of ground in short time. So it’s short, sweet and ultra-fascinating. But ask them how you pronounce it.

DEETS: Texas Theatre 231 W. Jefferson Blvd.  7 p.m. $5–$10. PKNDallas.org.

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Thursday 01.12

He’s a magic man
We’ve seen David Blaine be buried alive, frozen and more, but what’s behind the man of magic? Blaine talks about what inspires his death-defying feats and hopefully he’ll throw in some tricks, too.

DEETS: Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. 8 p.m. $20. ATTPAC.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 6, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

DJ Joe Gauthreaux spins the tunes at The Brick’s one-year anniversary party

They just grow so fast

It’s hard to believe that in such a short time, the Brick closed, reopened and now is celebrating its first year in the new location. In a short time, the club has made its mark on the dance scene moving away from its initial leather/Levi environment to a club destination for national and local DJs. For the party, they bring in DJ Joe Gauthreaux from New York City. And don’t forget Joe’s Place next door. The smaller bar side of the club still maintains a cool vibe but gets in on the action as well.

DEETS: The Brick/Joe’s Place, 2525 Wycliff Ave., #120. Doors at 9 p.m. 18+. BrickDallas.com

—  Rich Lopez

Gay Dallas couple legally weds in Texas, aims to bring ‘e-marriage’ to the same-sex masses

Mark Reed, left, and Dante Walkup

John Wright  |  Online Editor
wright@dallasvoice.com

Each year countless gay and lesbian couples travel from Texas to places where same-sex marriage is legal to tie the knot.

But Mark Reed hopes same-sex couples in Texas will soon be able to conveniently — and legally — marry without even leaving the state.

Reed, a board member for the national LGBT direct action group GetEQUAL, recently married his longtime partner, Dante Walkup, at the W Dallas Victory hotel.

Their “Skype” wedding was officiated via teleconference from Washington, D.C., where same-sex marriage is legal, and they received their license in the mail a short time later.

It’s called “e-marriage,” and it’s a sort of high-tech version of the proxy wedding traditionally held when one of the parties can’t be physically present — because, for example, they’re in the military stationed overseas.

“The reason we wanted to do it this way is because we wanted to have a wedding here in Dallas with our family and friends,” Reed said. “It was very important that all of our family came. It was the first time they actually met, even though we’ve been together 10 years. If we had to go to D.C., there’s no way we could have had the people there who we wanted to be there.”

Reed and Walkup, co-owners of WDM Lighting on Oak Lawn Avenue, were married in a conference room at the W hotel on Oct. 10, in front of about 80 people with a 6-by-8-foot screen looming behind them.

The couple had rented a similar room at a W hotel in Washington, where marriage quality activist Sheila Alexander-Reid officiated the wedding.

“When we walked down the aisle, as soon as we reached the front, she comes on the screen like The Wizard of Oz,” Reed said. “It was beautiful. It wasn’t make-believe. It was like she was really there.”

Although Reed and Walkup were able to hold their ceremony in Dallas, they had to go to D.C. beforehand to register. And Reed said while D.C.’s marriage law has no provision against e-marriage, the validity of the procedure could theoretically be challenged in court.

That’s why the couple is now working with legal experts and legislators from states where same-sex marriage is legal to draft statutes that would solidify the practice. Reed and Walkup traveled this week to Michigan for a symposium on e-marriage.

While the couple has no intention of using their case to challenge Texas’ bans on same-sex marriage, Reed said they want to make it more convenient and less expensive for same-sex couples to legally wed.

Reed is also in the process of changing his surname in a Texas court, and he’s been fighting The Dallas Morning News — thus far unsuccessfully — to print their announcement in “Weddings” instead of in another section called “Commitments.”

“It’s like the more equal we can get through creative ways, we’re going to do it,” Reed said. “It’s just important to do anything we can to find creative ways around inequality.”

—  John Wright