Transgender center launches intersex group

When a baby is born the first question most people ask is “is it a girl or a boy?” The doctor takes a look at the baby’s genitals, if they see a penis the child is declared a boy, if the see a vulva the child is called a girl. But sometimes a child’s anatomy is not that clear cut, and sometimes the genetics, physiology or anatomy of person is more complex than the penis=boy, vulva=girl equation. The umbrella term “intersex” is used to describe people whose physical bodies, hormones or chromosomes lie between the male and female ends of the spectrum.

According to the Intersex Society of North America somewhere between 1 in 1,500 and 1 in 2,000 babies born in this country have genitals that fall between the strict male/female dichotomy. Additionally, several genetic conditions exist where people who may appear strictly male or strictly female have chromosomal combinations other than XX or XY, a combination of XX and XY, or the chromosomes associated with one gender and the body associated with another. With so many intersex people walking around, there is a fairly good chance that you know one.

But according to “Koomah,” the founder of the group, very few spaces exist for intersex people to talk about their lives. “Most of the social and support groups that I’ve encountered are online,” says Koomah. “I’ve encountered a handful of people both in and outside of [Houston's] Transgender Center that are intersex-bodied but didn’t know anyone else who was. When I mentioned I was and spoke with them more in depth about my experience it seemed to be a great relief that their experience isn’t the only one.”

Koomah realised that their was a need for a group that would allow the intersex community to talk about their experiences. This realization led to the founding of the Transgender Centers Intersex group, which will have its first meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 7 pm at the Center (604 Pacific). The group is designed as an informal get-to-gether for those with intersex bodies and their spouses.

Koomah explains that while the transgender and intersex communities share many experiences the terms are not interchangeable. “While some intersex people do identify as transgender and some may choose to transition, sometimes the experience of being intersex is different,” says Kumayama. “Being intersex in childhood is radically different than the experience of other non-intersex folks, explaining your body to doctors can be scary, and making choices on things like transition or relationships are easier when you have people whom you share similar experience to talk with.”

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Reese Rideout Is Straight, Married, And Gay-Por-Pay Strictly For The Cash

"I love the fact that my husband has a beautiful body and people want to see it," says Becki. She is married to a porn star. Of the gay-for-pay variety. Fans know him as Reese Rideout, but his real name (or his real pseudonym) is Nicholas Dent. And getting so comfortable with her husband sleeping with anyone, let alone men, was a long journey.

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DOJ responds to LCR in DADT case, wants to strictly restrict ruling

Just got the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) response to the Log Cabin Republican’s proposed injunction.

We’ll have more, but a quick read shows that DOJ wants to limit the injunction to the “Plaintiff and Its Members.” It actually sounds like DOJ wants to out gay servicemembers, “without the names of LCR’s members, defendants would have no way of knowing whether a particular servicemember who is subject to the actions set forth is in fact a bona fide LCR member.”

The DOJ also objects because “Plaintiff’s Proposed Injunction Would Foreclose the United States from Litigating the Constitutionality of DADT in Other Courts.” Yes, DOJ wants to keep arguing that DADT is constitutional. And, DOJ wants to be able to move for a stay.

Finally, the DOJ seems awfully concerned that if LCR wins this case, then the Obama administration will no longer be able to find that gay servicemembers hurt morale and cohesion. Why is the Obama administration so concerned about losing the “right” to discriminate against gay and lesbian servicemembers? This lead reader BeccaM to make the following observation:

They’re saying you can only bring a case if you’re in the military and out yourself, then you can begin the years-long process of seeking injunctive relief, but in the meantime they’ll throw your ass out for being gay. Which then makes you ineligible to bring a case because you’re not in the military anymore and therefore lack standing.

This is not the brief of a party that wants to find a way out of this mess. The Obama administration is aggressively defending DADT when the Obama administration doesn’t have to do this. See here, here and here.

DADT: DOJ response to LCR’s proposed injunction




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