Follow the yellow brick road at Rice Cinema

Wizard of OzThere’s Wicked and The Wiz, there’s the classic Frank L. Baum books and Tinman, but nothing can touch the 1939 Victor Fleming classic The Wizard of Oz, for pure transcendent delight. See it for free on the big screen as Rice Cinema (6100 Main room MS-549) presents the tale of the Scarecrow, Tin Man, Cowardly Lion and Dorothy (and her little dog too) Friday and Saturday, January 13 & 14, at 7 pm.

—  admin

Houston ARCH seeks public submissions for new logo

Houston ARCH proposed logos

History relies on historians, whether the formal history of the academic or the informal history of grandpa’s stories, someone must tell the tale for the story to live on. The straight world has many formal institutions designed to maintain its story, from museums to archives to oral history projects the stories of straight people are well documented and preserved.

Queer history, on the other hand, is far more fragile. As a community we have a habit of separating ourselves by generations and the documents of our recent past, the fliers, t-shirts and pamphlets, are often seen as ephemeral trash, rather than important historical documents.

Several institutions have been created to try to preserve that history, including the Botts Archive, the Gulf Coast Archive, and archives at the University of Houston, Rice University and the Transgender Foundation of America. These desperate efforts have joined together to form the Houston Area Rainbow Collective History (Houston ARCH), a coordinated effort to preserve and document LGBT History in Houston.

Of course, any great organization needs a great logo, and that’s where Houston ARCH is reaching out to the public for help. Through January 5 you can submit your design via e-mail to billyhoya@billyhoya.info. Designs must contain the name “Houston ARCH,” and may spell out the acronym, also designs should be be scalable, work both in color and black and white, and be suitable for print and online reproduction. Designers should take care that their submissions are not confusable with logo’s of similarly named organizations.

So far only two proposals have been submitted and loaded to the Houston ARCH website for comment. Final voting for the design will take place January 25 at the regular Houston ARCH meeting.

—  admin

We Were Here, AIDS documentary at 14 Pews

We Were HereWe Were Here, the award winning documentary of the early days of the AIDS crisis, premiers at 14 Pews theater (800 Aurora) Saturday, November 20, at 4:30 pm. The film, from director David Weissman, will be proceeded by a panel discussion on the state of the AIDS crisis today.

I came out in 1998, right at the tail end of the worst days of the AIDS crisis. I remember, with vivid clarity, the days of the walking wounded: when every other gay man I met would tell how their doctor said they should have died five years ago, when the community told time by recalling if an event took place before or after a certain person’s funeral.

Fortunately those days are largely behind us, but as new HIV infections continue to rise and we struggle to maintain funding for medications that are keeping people alive (at a cost of thousands of dollars a month), it’s important that we never forget the early days of the pandemic. For people of my generation and younger the mysterious “Gay Plague” that threatened our community in the early eighties can seem more like a fairy tale monster than the horrifying crisis it was, and is.

We Were Here tells the real life stories of five people who survived. Their mundane and profound recollections highlight, not only their personal experiences, but the broad political and social upheavals unleashed by the crisis. From their different vantage points as caregivers, activists, researchers, as friends and lovers of the afflicted, and as people with AIDS themselves, the interviewees share stories which are not only intensely personal, but which also illuminate the much larger themes of that era: the political and sexual complexities, and the terrible emotional toll. The film highlights the role of women – particularly lesbians – in caring for and fighting for their gay brothers.

Tickets for We Were Here are $10 and can be purchased at 14pews.org.

After the jump watch the trailer for We Were Here.

—  admin

Movie Monday: ‘Circumstance’ at the Angelika

Princess of Persia

The lesbian romance Circumstance breaks many taboos, but for director Maryam Keshavarz, it was simply a story that had to be told.

The Arab Spring has meant a significant liberalization in Middle Eastern countries. But political freedom is one thing; artistic expression is still quite another. And, for that matter, Iran is not Egypt or Libya.

Not that the revolutions in those countries mattered to Maryam Keshavarz, who made the dauntingly radical film Circumstance. Although shot in comparatively open Lebanon (where it is still illegal to be gay), the story tells a tale of two Iranian woman who enter into a romance.

For the entire article, click here.

DEETS: Starring Nikohl Boosheri, Sarah Kazemy, Reza Sixo Safai. 107 minutes. R.

 

—  Rich Lopez

Applause: Broadgay at Winspear

Lexus series adds queer event to upcoming season of musicals

What’s gay about ‘Jersey Boys’? The GLBT Broadway subscriber series at the Winspear will tell you.

The Lexus Broadway Series offers a muscular lineup of shows that feature classic stories and contemporary rock ‘n’ roll. But they go one step further in the 2011-12 season with the stage equivalent of special edition DVDs, featuring enhanced performances and pre-show engagements for subscribers — including its gay patrons.

Dallas Voice Life+Style Editor Arnold Wayne Jones will host a conversation every second-week Tuesday about 45 minutes before each show. The series, called GLBT Broadway, will highlight the appeal for queer audiences for the shows in the series. The discussion will touch on issues of gender identity and sexuality in regards to the show and the teams behind them. Some — such as the season lead-off, Hair — might be easier to analyze from a gay perspective than, say, Jersey Boys, but that’s part of the fun of the series.

The season starts with Hair, which won the Tony in 2009 for best musical revival. Youth in 1960s America are all about peace, love and understanding — including nudity and homosexuality — in this iconic musical. Sept. 20–Oct. 2.

The epic Les Miserables follows with a new 25th anniversary production. Dec. 20–Jan. 1.

Best musical Tony winner In the Heights details the immigrant experience as characters find a new life in their new country. March 13–25.

Alt-rockers Green Day went Broadway with American Idiot, touted as a mashup of a rock concert and staged musical. May 8–20.

The season concludes with Jersey Boys and Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Classic hits like “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” tell the tale of this well-accomplished music group from the ‘50s. June 12–July 15.

Other subscriber series include Broadway University, hosted by SMU theater professor Kevin Hofeditz which will explore themes of the show and its place in theater history (every second Saturday matinee) and Broadway Uncorked (every second-week Wednesday), where an expert sommelier will host a wine tasting based on the show. We wonder what American Idiot’s wine will be.

— Rich Lopez

For more information on the Lexus Broadway Series and its enhanced performances, visit ATTPAC.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 26, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

‘Daughters of Darkness’ screens at Texas Theatre

What’s a little blood among strangers?

Campy horror with lesbian undertones is a match made in heaven. Or in this case, hell. The 1971 film Daughters of Darkness tells the tale of a young couple crossing paths with a mysterious and somehow ageless Marlene Dietrich wannabe countess and her pouty-lipped secretary. Does the countess find an interest in the new young lady or is it just your imagination? And does anyone notice how she only comes out at night?

DEETS: The Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. 9:45 p.m. $8. TexasTheatre.com.

—  Rich Lopez

A tale of two Lively press clippings

If Scott “the gay movement is a nuclear bomb” Lively is really shifting his focus away from the anti-gayness for which he’s known (most newsworthy in recent days for his belief that the Uganda “kill gays” bill is a “step in the right direction“), then nobody bothered to tell WorldNetDaily.

Check this out. On the left is a new Boston Globe piece about Lively’s supposed shift. On the right, a new WND piece touting a new edition on Lively’s anti-gay propaganda book, The Pink Swastika:

201101051246

Globe Link: Shift in mission for religious firebrand [BG]

WND link: Were Nazis a homosexual, pagan cult? That’s the conclusion of updated classic ‘The Pink Swastika’ [WND]

That’s the thing about careers defined by discrimination/aggression: The record is not going to change simply because the purveyor sees a need to move on to other ventures. Because we’re not talking about a TV show that ends end a two hour finale, or an independent book store that sells its product to the national megachain. We are talking about human lives and the persecution thereof. The mud from that hurtful business is thick and caked on to our shared society. It’s going to take much, more more than anecdotes and mainstream press clippings to wash off.

**

*SEE ALSO: A video about why we are suddenly supposed to be happy with his work:



***

*SEE ALSO: Alvin McEwen on WND’s piece: World Net Daily trying to exploit criticism of book linking gays to the Nazi party [PHB]




Good As You

—  admin

A Tale of 2 Gay Refugees: The Serbian In America, The Palestinian In Israel

Atlanta: The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ordered the Board of Immigration Appeals to review Mladen Zeljko Todorovic's gay asylum case, where he claims to have fled Serbia after being "raped by other soldiers when he served in the Serbian army, beaten by police officers and disowned by his father." Tel Aviv: Majed Koka, a Palestinian man who escaped to Israel 12 years ago at age 14 after facing anti-gay threats, and now lives with his Israeli partner, is still waiting to hear whether he'll be granted residency on amnesty grounds. In the meantime he's managed to get arrested nine times in 12 years.


Permalink | Post a comment | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , , , , , ,

Queerty

—  John Wright

In NYC, a tale of two fundraisers: ‘which one did more to advance LGBT equality?’

Another must-read column from Kerry Eleveld, providing some clarity to the events of this week:

Longtime LGBT activist David Mixner was one of about a dozen prominent equality advocates who attended the Mehlman-Singer fund-raiser, including lobbyist Steve Elmendorf, Winnie Stachelberg of the Center for American Progress, Evan Wolfson of Freedom to Marry, and Richard Socarides, former LGBT adviser and special assistant to President Bill Clinton.

Mixner said of the evening, “I never thought I would see the day in my lifetime” when a group of conservatives and equality activists gathered in the same room to rally around the fight for same-sex marriage.

“I’m in awe of this night,” he beamed. “Ya know, I’ve worked at this for years and years and years, and the purpose of a movement is to change minds and not to punish those who come late. And we’ve changed minds.”

Meanwhile, back on the east side, President Obama was trying to reason with protesters who were loudly registering their discontent with his administration’s funding for AIDS and efforts to end “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

“We heard your point,” Obama said in response to two of the shouting protesters. “This young lady here, she wants increases in AIDS funding. That’s great. We increased AIDS funding. She’d like more. I’m sure we could do more — if we’re able to grow this economy again. That young man shouted, ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ … As president, I said we would reverse it.”




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

An Adoption Tale of 2 States, 9000 Miles Apart

In Australia's New South Wales, a gay foster father is celebrating what's believed to be the state's first approval of a homosexual adopting a child, and the state's parliament just approved a law permitting same-sex couples to adopt together. Meanwhile in Florida, Vanessa Alenier a lesbian woman in a committed relationship with Melanie Leon (pictured R-L), continues to fight to adopt a relative's infant who was taken by state welfare authorities after his mother was deemed an unfit parent. While one court approved the adoption, it's been appealed by the Department of Children & Families, citing a 1977 state law barring gays from adopting, putting the boy's legal status in limbo. Congratulations, Florida!


Permalink | 1 comment | Add to del.icio.us
Tagged: , , , , ,

Queerty

—  John Wright