‘Tennessee Queer’ holds Dallas premiere in Oak Cliff

Actor - Jerre Dye (Paul)“When I was writing Tennessee Queer in 2011, the governor of Tennessee was afraid to strongly rebuke some religious conservatives who introduced anti-gay legislation at the state level, and the mayor of Memphis wouldn’t publicly speak out in favor of LGBT rights for city workers,” said gay Presbyterian deacon and filmmaker Mark Goshorn Jones.

The main character in the film says, “You can’t pick and choose verses from the Bible and quote them like they’re the goddamn U.S. Constitution.”

Tennessee Queer, Jones new film, holds its Dallas premiere at the Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff on March 31 at 7 p.m. A Q&A with the filmmaker follows the screening.

SYNOPSIS

After a few years in New York City, out and proud Jason Potts returns to his Tennessee hometown only to find things haven’t changed for LGBT teenagers. Being gay is still the worst thing to be in Smyth, Tennessee.

Wanting to help these gay teens and give them some hope, Jason hatches a plan while he’s home for the weekend. Things quickly spiral out of control as Jason is put in charge of the first-ever gay pride parade in this sleepy, small southern town.

Unknown to Jason, a scheming conservative city councilman and a holier-than-thou minister plan to round up Smyth’s gay teens after the parade and send them off to an ex-gay ministry camp to be cured of their sinful ways. Will Jason succeed with the parade? Will he be run out of town before the parade? Will the gay teenagers be sent away? Tune in as hilarity ensues in this heartwarming comedy.

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—  David Taffet

6 ways to fabulize your week

divineWe’re all about diversity in the gay community, and here’s how we prove it.

Let’s say you have a hankering to spend some time in the dark with gay Latinos this week. We got some suggestions. One is by seeing the musical Kiss of the Spider Woman at the Kalita Humphreys Theater, a musical set in a South American prison. Another is checking out Men on the Verge of a His-Panic Breakdown at Teatro Dallas, which features nine comic monologues dealing with all aspects of the gay Latin experience in the U.S.

If you’re tastes fall more along the lines of WASPy gay humor, you can still try to scrounge up a seat to Kathy Griffin, who is performing tonight at the Verizon Theatre. She’ll certainly talk about Kardashians, Real Housewives and, of course, “her gays.”

If that’s not your style, perhaps a little drag is what you need. The Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff is screening a 35mm print of John Waters’ outrageous classic Polyester tonight at 9:30 p.m., followed by a John Waters-themed dance party at 11. Costumes are encouraged. (You know you wanna try out that Tracy Turnblad get-up you have!)

If you wanna up the fashion quotient, the DFashion Week runway show — an inaugural fundraiser benefiting AIDS Arms and LifeWalk — comes to the Rose Room on Saturday. You can get tickets here.

For those who prefer the whole smorgasbord of choices, and like to be entertained as well, Sunday night is the Voice of Pride finals at the Rose Room. Ten singers walk in, one walks out with the title, cash, plane tickets … and bragging rights.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Watch Tuesday’s debate with Stonewall Democrats or Log Cabin Republicans

Both Log Cabin Republicans and Stonewall Democrats are planning watch parties for the town hall-format presidential debate on Tuesday, Oct. 16.

Log Cabin will join Dallas County Young Republicans at Stoneleigh P, 2626 Maple Ave. at 8 p.m.

Stonewall Democrats begin the evening with their general meeting at Ojeda’s on Maple Avenue at 6 p.m. Dallas City Councilman Scott Griggs will speak on the upcoming bond election, and Denise Rodriguez will represent Planned Parenthood PAC.

At 7:30 p.m., the group moves to Woody’s on Cedar Springs Road for its debate watch party.

On Oct. 18, Stonewall is staffing an Obama phone bank at Dallas Democratic Party headquarters, 4209 Parry St.

Stonewall will host its third debate watch party at the Texas Theatre on Jefferson Avenue in Oak Cliff on Oct. 22, the day early voting begins.

The Texas Democratic Party announced a partnership with Stonewall Democrats of Texas called “Come Out and Vote.” Launched on National Coming Out Day, Come Out and Vote encourages members of the LGBT community to early-vote on Oct. 27.

“This is another way for the LGBT community and its allies to celebrate and exhibit their strength and pride by engaging in the voting process,” Jacob Limon, Texas Democratic Party deputy executive director, wrote in a press release.

 

—  David Taffet

Oak Cliff Film Fest runs throughout the weekend

Texas tales

The inaugural Oak Cliff Film Festival gets underway tonight showcasing the local and statewide films with a few national and international screenings to boot. But perhaps the real gem is watching movies in all the cool venues the OCFF is home to. The historic Texas Theatre, the Kessler Theater, Bishop Arts Theater, the Belmont Hotel and even the Dallas Zoo all screen films throughout the festival and make for a different feel. You know, the way Oak Cliff likes to do it.

DEETS: Various venues. $10 per film. The festival runs through Sunday. OakCliffFilmFestival.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Gain the edge on the Oscar pool with shorts

In this week’s issue, I’ll be giving my predictions for the Oscars, which are on Sunday. The secret to winning the office pool? Seeing all the obscure films that no one known how to vote on.

Well, it’s not a secret how to do it — just track down the shorts programs.

For the past several years, the Magnolia Theatre has hosted screenings of the live action shorts and animated shorts — usually just for one week. This year, though, they’ve extended it — you can catch the films all weekend, up to and including Oscar night. The slate of films — the five nominated for best live action, the five nominated for best animated, and two additional animated shorts — are a hodgepodge of comic and sentimental.

But there’s an even rarer opportunity tonight only: You can see four of the five documentary shorts at the Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff. The docs have never been part of the Magnolia’s lineup, but the Texas Theatre has run them a few nights this week; tonight is the final chance to see them, at 7 p.m.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Movie Monday: Oscar nominated doc shorts at Texas Theatre

Oscar countdown

Be proud if you’ve seen all the major nominees for this year’s Oscars, but impress your watching party by throwing down some knowledge when this category comes up. The Texas Theatre helps round out those slightly obscure awards by featuring this year’s crops of documentary shorts. And the nominees are The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement, God Is the Bigger Elvis, Incident in New Baghdad,  Saving Face and The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom. The theater screens ‘em all save for God, but that’ll be enough to make an informed decision and give you the edge on that Oscar pool.

DEETS: The Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. 7 p.m. $9. TheTexasTheatre.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Golden Globe watch party at The Texas Theatre

Loving on Gervais’ Globes

Everyone was in a tizzy last year when Ricky Gervais ripped so many new ones into Hollywood at the Golden Globes. Surprise! He’s back. And with good reason — he’s the best part.

DEETS: Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. 7 p.m. Free. TheTexasTheatre.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Free “Christmas Evil” screening at Texas Theatre

Christmas ain’t over yet

In tonight’s edition of the Texas Theatre’s Tuesday Night Trash, they go all out for the Yuletide with the campy fright flick, Christmas Evil. When a kid finds out Santa isn’t real and a killing spree follows, well, it might be tough to connect the dots. Childhood trauma that leads to adult dysfunction might sound like a Dr. Phil episode, but thankfully, it’s in the 1980 hands of Lewis Jackson. What could be better?

DEETS: The Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. 9 p.m. Free. TheTexasTheatre.com

—  Rich Lopez

Inaugural Oak Cliff Film Festival announced

Aviation Cinemas, the company who purchased the Texas Theatre, just announced their plans for the first Oak Cliff Film Festival, a fest that  celebrates “brave and independent filmmaking of all stripes.” The OCFF is set to happen next summer throughout various venues in the OC. Texas Theatre director Jason Reimer will lead the acquisitions team along with Blake Ethridge, formerly with Fantastic Fest.

While the plan is to give emphasis to Texas filmmakers, the goal is to become a viable international festival. Makes sense and Oak Cliff is an easy sell. With such host venues like The Kessler, Texas Theatre, The Belmont and Bishop Arts Theater, the festival will play in all renovated spots in the area. Already, this isn’t your typical festival.

The projected dates for the OCFF is June 14–17, 2012. Want your film to be a part of it? Submissions open here Nov. 7.

—  Rich Lopez

GIVEAWAY: Tix to Fears for Queers 2 this Saturday at the Texas Theatre

You can read all about the upcoming Fears for Queers GLBT Horror Film Fest in this week’s issue, but festival co-founder Shawn Ewert wanted to invite a couple of Dallas Voice readers to check out the day’s events on the house. He’s given us two pairs of tickets to the kinda all-day festival on Saturday.

The films screen from 2 –7 p.m. at the Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff.

Wanna check it out? Email us here with “Scare my pants off” in the subject line to win a pair.

UPDATE: Congrats to Pam and Kenneth. They were randomly selected to win a pair each for tomorrow’s fest.

—  Rich Lopez