WATCH: ‘Blurred Lines’ parody just made for left-leaning Texans

This is a funny parody of Robin Thicke’s viral “Blurred Lines” video, for a few reasons: First, it’s about Fort Worth’s Wendy Davis. Second, it continually calls Rick Perry a dick. Third, unlike Thicke’s video, it objectifies men, which we’re all in favor of. (And if you like it, there are plenty of sexy-men-filled versions on YouTube.) Enjoy!

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WATCH: Steve Grand’s ‘All-American Boy’

SteveGrand

Remember when it was a big deal when recording artists came out of the closet? Oh, right, that was just last year.

But things are changing. Not only do we have hot gay acts like Adam Lambert, Frank Ocean and Rufus Wainwright coming out once they made a name for themselves, we have up-and-coming singers doing it right off the bat … and being really out about it. That’s the case with Steve Grand, whose country-tinged “All-American Boy” has become a YouTube sensation. If you haven’t seen it yet, enjoy.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WATCH: Samwell’s ‘Just Be Free’

Screen shot 2013-03-29 at 11.49.19 AMRemember Samwell? He’s the musician who had an unlikely cult viral video with the song “What What (In the Butt)” three years ago. Well, he’s back, with more out-and-proud fun, plus cross-dressing — and, honestly, a lot more musicality (and better a lyric, though that’s not hard to imagine). It’s got some cred as a dance track, and it’s brand new — and more or less safe for work. Take a look and listen here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

The Rainbow connection

Want viral video that’s gay and funny? Meet web star Randy Rainbow

MIKEY ROX  | Contributing Writer mikey@paperroxscissors.com

RANDY GUY  |  Internet comedian Randy Rainbow makes videos about, for instance, his romance with Mel Gibson.
RANDY GUY | Internet comedian Randy Rainbow makes videos about, for instance, his romance with Mel Gibson.

Web sensation Randy Rainbow keeps good company. He has dated Mel Gibson. He attended Chelsea Clinton’s wedding. He’s BFFs with Lindsay Lohan. And if you’re dim enough to believe any of that, he has a bridge to sell you.

Truth is, Rainbow doesn’t know any of those people. But his hilarious videos — which use audio clips of celebrities, like Gibson’s infamous hate-spewing voicemails and Dr. Laura’s racially charged radio show segment — might convince you otherwise.

Quite possibly the LGBT community’s hottest commodity since Ricky Martin popped out the closet, the NYC-based blogger talks about his Broadway roots, his appearance on PerezHilton and how you can stalk him on Facebook (phone number included!). Warning: That call may be monitored or taped for nefarious purposes.

Visit Rainbow Rainbow on his blog at TheRandyRainbowBlahg.com.

Dallas Voice: I just re-watched a few of your now-famous videos and they’re even funnier the third time around. Where did your gift for comedy come from? Randy Rainbow: I come from a very funny, very silly family, so that helps. I’m also something of a comedy junkie. I’ve been observing and absorbing it in every medium since I was a kid. I think humor is the most important thing in this life.

Your blog primarily caters to a Broadway-minded crowd, so what made you sort of veer off that track and pursue mainstream celebs in your bits? The heart of the blog has always been Broadway, as I’ve always been a big show queen. Over the years, though, it’s strayed and become more all encompassing because my interests and opinions extend beyond just theater. The new website I’m working on will include lots of Broadway, but won’t be quite as concentrated. There’s just too much material out there to pass up.

You’ve received a good amount of press from the gay blogs, like Queerty and Towleroad. How have things changed now that a massive audience has found you? Any interesting opportunities — or propositions?  Well, I’m still single, if that’s what you’re getting at. But yes, the exposure has been incredible. New and exciting opportunities are popping up almost every day.

Tell us about the day your Lindsay Lohan video was featured on Perez Hilton. The last time I wrote about Perez, I have called him a self-loathing sloth. I had no idea it was coming! Luckily, I’d washed my hair that morning, but otherwise, there was no preparation. All of a sudden, I had like 40 new e-mails in my inbox and I knew something was up. Perez had subscribed to my YouTube channel when the Mel Gibson thing really hit, so I was hopeful he’d post something of mine eventually.

You’re obviously very good at building a personal brand (I don’t believe for a second that your legal name is Randy Rainbow). For all those gays out there just trying to make a fake name for themselves, what advice can you give? First of all, how dare you?! Believe it or not, Randy Rainbow is the name on my birth certificate. It sounds like the gayest of all stage names, but it is in fact nothing but the truth. Trust me — I would not make that shit up. It’s working out great for me now, but it was a very traumatic childhood.

You know your phone number is still on your Facebook page, right? You’re kind of famous now and some crazy gay is totally gonna stalk your life if you don’t remove it. You’ll never know who it is, either, because I’ll — er, he’ll — block the calls. I didn’t realize that, but thank you for bringing it to my attention. Come to think of it, I have been getting a lot of missed calls from undisclosed numbers.

You’re all over the Internet and your fans are waiting for your next comedic masterpiece. Whatcha got for us? I’m gonna continue crankin’ out the videos. I’m even starting to get some fancy guest stars, so look out for those. Stay tuned for the new website. We’re hoping to officially launch at the beginning of the new year. Lots of other fun stuff is in the works, and I’ll certainly keep you posted. For now, everyone should check my blog regularly, subscribe to me on YouTube, follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook. I will sleep with anyone who does. My phone number is listed.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 29, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas

Sticky sweet

Cheeky raps and beefcake videos? Yes. But Cazwell is serious about his music … even if he is a club diva

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

HIS ‘ICE CREAM’ BRINGS THE BOYS TO THE YARD  |  Damn right! Cazwell, in front with white hat, put together his viral video in a day, but the rap is poised to be his biggest hit yet — thanks in large part to all the beefcake.
HIS ‘ICE CREAM’ BRINGS THE BOYS TO THE YARD | Damn right! Cazwell, in front with white hat, put together his viral video in a day, but the rap is poised to be his biggest hit yet — thanks in large part to all the beefcake.

CAZWELL
Station 4, 3911 Cedar Springs Road. Sept. 30 at midnight. Doors at 9 p.m. $15.
Caven.com.

………………………………..

The most surprising thing about Cazwell is his soft-spoken demeanor. With all the bravado in his rhymes, ranging from overtly sexual to ridiculously fun, he’s really just a guy. He just happens to also be the toast of gay club culture. But first thing’s first.

“Normally it takes a couple of months of planning,” he says. “But we did this quick.”

He’s referring to “Ice Cream Truck,” his rap and video which has turned into a sensation on gay dancefloors everywhere.

With a bevy of scantily clad beefcakes, including the tattooed hunk himself, the music video is two minutes and change of amateur production that doesn’t matter one bit — its guerrilla roots aside, it’s sexy as hell. When the video pops up at Station 4, the boys aren’t hoppin’; they’re staring at the monitors.

“That’s awesome,” he chuckles. “We were just gonna run up an ice cream truck with some friends and make it into this summer video. I knew some of the guys; Marco [Ovando, the director] knew others, and they came over. We filmed the whole thing at my apartment in a day.”

The video was posted a month ago on YouTube by Cazwell’s label, Peace Bisquit, and has notched more than 2 million views. For what started out as “a stupid song” for a movie called Spork, the old-school rap recorded in three hours is positioned to be Cazwell’s biggest hit to date.

With this tune and others such as  “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “I Buy My Socks on 14th Street,” it’s easy to get the impression that Cazwell is more club kid than musician. And that would be wrong.

“I am serious about music,” he says. “Just because I don’t get too deep with my lyrics shouldn’t make me feel like I don’t do a good job. I’m flowing with it and I know I’m doing a good job. I think people might take things way too seriously. I just want people to connect to what I’ve done.”

Good thing, then, that he’s down with the people almost every night.

“Clubs are my life. I’m out like five nights a week,” he admits. “I don’t think anything shapes my music as much.”

Cazwell’s music is club-based, with slick danceable beats and raps that flow well over his groove. He’s a throwback to actual disco from its heyday. Cazwell and his team cleverly sidestep the detachment of DJ-induced techno and house and deliver reliable music to dance to.

“DJing has influenced my music and lyrics,” he says. “To me it’s more about the hook and lyrics. I think people don’t wanna think so much. That’s what I’m hearing in clubs. People just want to dance.”

With a big life in the circuit and club scene, Cazwell seems to have a very un-Lohan like air. He describes himself as a closet health nut and begins discussing his crash regimen to get cut for “Ice Cream Truck:” He swears by liquid meals and cleansing protocols.

“That’s changed my life the most,” he says. “I see results really quick and I’ve lost most of my cravings for processed foods — unless I’m stoned. Plus, I go to the gym as much as I can.”

Regardless of his boisterous persona and ability to get shirtless faster than Matthew McConaughey at a paparazzi convention, Cazwell is just a timid soul. Or so he says.

“The thing that would surprise most people about me is that I’m really, really shy,” he says. “People don’t expect that and sometimes I think they feel like I’m not making an effort. But, yeah, I’m painfully shy. “

He assures that won’t be an issue at Thursday’s meet and greet after his show at Station 4 — he knows how to turn it on. Mostly, he looks forward to meeting the fans he gained with his last show in Dallas at minc back in 2007. Plus, being in a different city than the Big Apple gives him some new perspective.

“Sometimes I take it for granted that I live in New York City where all these gay guys know the words,” he says. “I think they gain a sense of entitlement, but in a good way. I want people to feel like that. I hate to sound corny but it’s cooler to be gay than straight and I want people to get a taste of that.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 24, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas